Performer

Analog Arts is an ensemble and production company with a track record of highly eclectic projects. One of their specialties is the music of Karlheinz Stockhausen, and Analog’s U.S. premiere of the composer’s Klang cycle was hailed as a Top Ten Classical Music concert of 2016 by New York magazine. The New York Times called Analog Arts’ production of Klang at the Metropolitan Museum of Art the “perfect match of music and place” and “properly impressive celebration”.

Initially performing as the Analog Music Ensemble in 2001, the group’s first concert was organized by two trumpeters who sought to continue their creative collaboration, though separated by some 400 miles. That first performance in a one-room stone church deep in the Maryland countryside planted the seeds of an idea that would finally take root with the creation of Analog Arts three years later.

That year, Analog established ARTSaha!, a nationally recognized new music festival based in Omaha. Over the five years of its operation, ARTSaha! presented everything from retrospectives of Samuel Beckett, to a chamber reduction of Rameau’s Les Fêtes d’Hébé, as well as a performance of Ballet Mécanique with the film, a symphony of automobiles, and an Aeolian Kite-In.

In 2007, Analog introduced the Iron Composer competition, which pits five composers against each other in an intensive day of writing, rehearsing, and performance. In addition to live events, Analog Arts has released recordings of composers ranging from Bach and Rachmaninoff to Hannah Lash and Andy Akiho, as well as its own members.

As a non-profit corporation, funding for Analog’s programs has come from the Mid-Atlantic Arts Foundation, the Aaron Copland Fund for Music, the Amphion Foundation, Meet the Composer, the Nebraska Arts Council, the Nebraska Humanities Council, as well as corporations like Microsoft and Fidelity Insurance. Analog’s institutional partners have included the Metropolitan Museum of Art, musikFabrik, WCLV FM 104.9, Baldwin-Wallace College, the University of Nebraska at Omaha, and the Bemis Center for the Arts.

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